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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

1 edition of Colonial justice in British India found in the catalog.

Colonial justice in British India

Elizabeth Kolsky

Colonial justice in British India

by Elizabeth Kolsky

  • 377 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Race relations,
  • Violence,
  • Administration of Justice,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 234-247) and index.

    StatementElizabeth Kolsky
    SeriesCambridge studies in Indian history and society -- 17, Cambridge studies in Indian history and society -- 17.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKNS3411 .K65 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 252 p. :
    Number of Pages252
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25201157M
    ISBN 100521116864
    ISBN 109780521116862
    LC Control Number2010277555
    OCLC/WorldCa495440281

    Abstract [Extract] Elizabeth Kolsky's book is centred on the relationship between law, violence and the development of the colonial state. It provides a legal, social and political analysis of how the British in India all too readily were able to literally get away with murder.   Sir Colin Campbell offers India to Lord Palmerston, who shelters behind a chair. Hulton Archive/Print Collectors/Getty Images. This cartoon appeared in Punch in , at the end of the Indian Mutiny (also called the Sepoy Rebellion). Sir Colin Campbell, the 1st Baron Clyde, had been appointed Commander in Chief of British forces in lifted a siege on foreigners in Lucknow and .

    British raj, period of direct British rule over the Indian subcontinent from until the independence of India and Pakistan in The raj succeeded management of the subcontinent by the British East India Company, after general distrust and dissatisfaction with company leadership resulted in a widespread mutiny of sepoy troops in , causing the British to reconsider the structure of. In Ghosh's study the dynamics of colonial inequities within interracial families reflect how gender and race hierarchies paralleled social order in the colonial settlements of the East India Company. Long before such relationships became taboo within the larger British Empire, the colonial mind was infested with such distinctions.

    Colonial Justice in British India: White Violence and the Rule of Law. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, S. $ (cloth), ISBN Reviewed by James Jaffe Published on H-Law (November, ) Commissioned by . This rich cultural history set in Punjab examines a little-studied body of popular literature to illustrate both the durability of a vernacular literary tradition and the limits of colonial dominance in British India. Farina Mir asks how qisse, a vibrant genre of epics and romances, flourished in colonial Punjab despite British efforts to marginalize the Punjabi language.


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Colonial justice in British India by Elizabeth Kolsky Download PDF EPUB FB2

Colonial Justice in British India describes and examines the lesser-known history of white violence in colonial India. By foregrounding crimes committed by a mostly forgotten cast of European characters - planters, paupers, soldiers and sailors - Elizabeth Kolsky argues that violence was not an exceptional but an ordinary part of British rule in the subcontinent/5.

Elizabeth Kolsky‘s, Colonial Justice in British India: White Violence and the Rule of Law recently published by Cambridge University Press is a significant intervention into understanding how criminal law comes to operate in India.

Kolsky challenges the central justification of British governance, the promise of the rule of law as opposed to the rule of men. Colonial Justice in British India: White Violence and the Rule of Law Cambridge Studies in Indian History and Society: : Kolsky, Elizabeth: Books5/5(2).

Colonial Justice in British India describes and examines the lesser-known history of white violence in colonial India. By foregrounding crimes committed by a mostly forgotten cast of European characters - planters, paupers, soldiers and sailors - Elizabeth Kolsky argues that violence was not an exceptional but an ordinary part of British rule in the subcontinent/5(16).

Colonial Justice in British India describes the lesser-known history of the violence and criminal conduct of one group of European planters, paupers, sailors and soldiers in British India. In a powerful corrective to dominant views, this study reveals the disquieting violence that accompanied imperial forms of power.

[Extract] Elizabeth Kolsky's book is centred on the relationship between law, violence and the development of the colonial state.

It provides a legal, social and political analysis of how the British in India all too readily were able to literally get away with murder. She argues that racial violence was a constant and constituent element of British dominance in India, and that regular acts of Author: Chris Cunneen.

Colonial Justice in British India Colonial Justice in British India describes and examines the lesser-known history of white violence in colonial India. By foregrounding crimes This book is joyfully dedicated to the love of my life, my husband, my partner, my.

COLONIAL ORDER, BRITISH LAW: THE EMPIRE AND INDIA Codification and the Rule of Colonial Difference: Criminal Procedure in British India ELIZABETH KOLSKY On Jan aspiring young English lawyer named Thomas Babing-ton Macaulay stood before the Parliament and presented an impassioned argument about the future role of British governance.

Top 10 books about the British in India From Rudyard Kipling to William Dalrymple, these titles document the folly, cruelty and heroism of the Raj Ferdinand Mount. Khorakiwala R. () Depictions of Justice in the Colonial Courts of British India: The Judicial Iconography of the Bombay High Court.

In: Huygebaert S., Martyn G., Paumen V., Bousmar E., Rousseaux X. (eds) The Art of Law. An Independent, Colonial Judiciary: A History of the Bombay High Court during the British Raj, ; Abhinav Chandrachud, Oxford University Press, Rs You.

Hindu nationalism has emerged as a political ideology represented by the Hindu Mahasabha. This book explores the campaign for Hindu unity and organisation in the context of the Hindu-Muslim conflict in colonial north India in the early twentieth century.

It argues. Development of Judicial system during British India The beginning of Indian common law is traced back to when a Mayor’s Court in Madras, Bombay, and Calcutta was established by.

India was ruled by the British for years — first by the private East India Company, and then by the British government after the East India Company was finally abolished. So if you want a textbook example of the great experiment of colonialism, well, here's what life was really like in colonial British India.

British India, consisting of the directly-ruled British presidencies and provinces, contained the most populous and valuable parts of the British Empire and thus became known as "the jewel in the British crown". India, during its colonial era, was a founding member of the League of Nations, a participating nation in the Summer Olympics in   However, in India, the British were a thin on-the-ground force of soldiers and civil servants, most of whom only intended to live and work in India in the short term.

This trend began with the East India Company, a company founded by London merchants in that enjoyed a government-sanctioned monopoly over English trade on the South Asian sub. Colonial Justice in British India: White Violence and the Rule of Law.

(Cambridge Studies in Indian History and Society, number ) New York: Cambridge University Press. xi, $ E lizabeth K olsky. Colonial Justice in British India: White Violence and the Rule of Law. (Cambridge Studies in Indian History and Society, number.

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the Irish police model was ideally suitable for colonial India. The Police Commissions of British, i.e. the revenue, justice, police, education, medical, public works, engineering, postal and railway services as well as the provincial civil services. India thus offered highly-paid careers to an appreciable portion of the British middle and upper classes (particularly for its peripheral members from Scotland and Ireland).

The Jurisprudence of Emergency examines British colonial rule in India from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century in order to trace tensions between the ideology of liberty and government by law, which was used to justify the British presence, and the colonizing power's concurrent insistence on a regime of conquest.